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Credit Recovery English

For the courses most often needed to meet graduation requirements, prescriptive settings and pretests have been added to enable personalized learning for every student. Students are able to accelerate through content over which they have demonstrated mastery and are pointed to specific content based on areas of deficiency.  The prescriptive features help students efficiently recover credits.

Literacy Advantage English III

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As the third step in a four-year language arts program, English III: American Literature builds on the literary and communication skills that 11th-grade students have developed in English I and II.

Students are exposed to a variety of genres and voices in American literature from the colonial to contemporary eras by reading titles such as My Ántonia, Death of a Salesman, and The Way to Rainy Mountain. With increasing sophistication, students examine how the historical context of literary works is reflected in thematic and stylistic textual elements.

Throughout the course, emphasis is placed on helping students develop and refine their critical reading and writing skills. Students write expository, research, and creative compositions while honing critical and analytic skills through close readings of literary, historical, expository, and functional documents. Alongside their investigations of connections between historical context and literary works, students participate in a variety of activities designed to build practical skills, including studies of functional documents and workplace communication.

Both semesters of the course culminate in an extensive unit focused on building writing skills. In semester one, students practice synthesizing key concepts from source texts and write a thesis-driven response to their synthesis. In semester two, students practice gathering, evaluating, synthesizing, presenting, and documenting information in a unit dedicated to writing research reports.

The content is based on the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) standards and is aligned with state standards.

Literacy Advantage English II

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In English II: Critical Reading and Effective Writing, students read literature from around the world in the following genres: short story, poetry, drama, and the novel. They also read examples of informational writing, such as letters, websites, magazine and newspaper articles, and speeches. Students work with their knowledge of literary elements to read critically and practice composition writing.

Students are guided through the writing process as they create narrative, expository, and persuasive compositions. Support in the form of process guides and graphic organizers helps reluctant writers to internalize strategies and develop composition skills. Select activities target text-handling skills and promote improved performance on commonly assessed literary analysis and response standards.

Extensive scaffolding provides below-proficient readers access to essential concepts and skills in English literature and composition. Accessible text and support documents like graphic reading guides and writing process guides help striving readers and reluctant writers achieve success with challenging content such as classic works and academic writing assignments. This strategic support, including explicit comprehension and vocabulary strategies, helps students master material while simultaneously developing their literacy skills. Note-taking guides make use of graphic organizers to support engagement with direct instruction and develop crucial study skills.

The content is based on the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) standards and is aligned to state standards.

Literacy Advantage English I

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Introduction to Literature and Composition is a valuable introduction to the study of literature and the reading of informational texts, and it offers ample opportunity to practice composition writing.

Students read literature from around the world in the following genres: short story, poetry, memoir, autobiography, drama, and epic. They also read examples of informational writing, such as letters, Web sites, magazine and newspaper articles, speeches, and movie or book reviews.

Along the way, they acquire and practice reading skills and strategies that are directly applicable to these literary and informational reading materials. Study Sheets support engagement with direct instruction and develop note-taking and study skills while also guiding students through the process of synthesizing information.

Robust support in the form of process guides and graphic organizers helps reluctant writers to internalize strategies and develop composition skills. Select activities target text-handling skills and promote improved performance on commonly assessed literary analysis and response standards. These activities employ the writing process to create narrative, expository, and persuasive compositions.

Accessible text assists students in comprehending academic English content. New vocabulary is supported with rollover definitions and usage examples that feature audio and graphical representations of terms. Literacy development is promoted through explicit instruction in active-reading and vocabulary strategies. Students also develop comprehension strategies unique to academic reading and learning in English language arts.

The content is based on the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) standards and is aligned to state standards.

Literacy Advantage – English

Courses provide a complete breadth of standards coverage, depth of instruction, and integrated formative and summative assessments.  Literacy Advantage allows students with extensive literacy support.

AP English Literature and Composition

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AP* English Literature and Composition immerses students in novels, plays, poems, and short stories from various periods. Students will read and write daily, using a variety of multimedia and interactive activities, interpretive writing assignments, and class discussions to assess and improve their skills and knowledge. The course places special emphasis on reading comprehension, structural and critical analysis of written works, literary vocabulary, and recognizing and understanding literary devices. The equivalent of an introductory college-level survey class, this course prepares students for the AP exam and for further study in creative writing, communications, journalism, literature, and composition.

This course has been authorized by the College Board to use the AP designation.

*AP is a registered trademark of the College Board.

Semesters 1 and 2: Required

  • The Norton Anthology of Poetry, 5th ed. Margaret Ferguson, Mary Jo Salter et al, eds. (W.W. Norton, 2005).
    ISBN-10: 0393979202 / ISBN-13: 9780393979206
    Acceptable alternate: 4th ed. (1996). ISBN-10: 0393968200
  • Short Fiction: An Anthology, 1st ed. (Bedford/St. Martins, 2009).
    ISBN-10: 0312576374
    NOTE: This custom anthology is available only from Apex Learning or MBS Direct.
    Acceptable alternates:
    The Story and Its Writer, 7th ed. Ann Charters, ed. (Bedford / St. Martins, 2007). ISBN-10: 0312442718
    The Story and Its Writer, 6th ed. Ann Charters, ed. (Bedford / St. Martins, 2002). ISBN-10: 0312397313
    The Story and Its Writer, 5th ed. Ann Charters, ed. (Bedford / St. Martins, 1998). ISBN-10: 0312171641

Semester 1: Required

  • Hedda Gabler. Henrik Ibsen (Dover, 1990).
    ISBN-10: 0486264696 / ISBN-13: 9780486264691
    Other editions acceptable
  • A Streetcar Named Desire. Tennessee Williams (Signet, 1947).
    ISBN-10: 0451167783 / ISBN-13: 9780451167781
    Other editions acceptable
  • Their Eyes Were Watching God. Zora Neale Hurston (Harper, 2006).
    ISBN-10: 0060838671 / ISBN-13: 9780060838676
    Other editions acceptable
  • Twelfth Night. William Shakespeare. Barbara A. Mowat and Paul Werstine, eds. (Washington Square Press, 1993). ISBN-10: 0743482778 / ISBN-13: 9780743482776
    Other editions acceptable

Semester 2: Required

  • The Great Gatsby. F. Scott Fitzgerald (Scribner, 1995).
    ISBN-10: 0743273567 / ISBN-13: 9780743273565
    Other editions acceptable
  • Annie John. Jamaica Kincaid (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1985).
    ISBN-10: 0374525102 / ISBN-13: 9780374525101
    Other editions acceptable
  • Jane Eyre. Charlotte Bronte. Michael Mason, ed. (Penguin, 2006).
    ISBN-10: 0141441143 / ISBN-13: 9780141441146
    Other editions acceptable

AP English Language and Composition

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In AP* English Language and Composition, students investigate rhetoric and its impact on culture through analysis of notable fiction and nonfiction texts, from pamphlets to speeches to personal essays. The equivalent of an introductory college-level survey class, this course prepares students for the AP exam and for further study in communications, creative writing, journalism, literature, and composition.

Students explore a variety of textual forms, styles, and genres. By examining all texts through a rhetorical lens, students become skilled readers and analytical thinkers. Focusing specifically on language, purpose, and audience gives them a broad view of the effect of text and its cultural role. Students write expository and narrative texts to hone the effectiveness of their own use of language, and they develop varied, informed arguments through research. Throughout the course, students are evaluated with assessments specifically designed to prepare them for the content, form, and depth of the AP Exam.

AP English Language and Composition is recommended for 11th and 12th grade students.  This course builds from the content offered in Apex Learning’s 11th grade English courses.  Consequently, we recommend that students take only one of the following courses: English 11, Texas English III, and AP English Language and Composition.

This course has been authorized by the College Board to use the AP designation.

*AP is a registered trademark of the College Board.

Semesters 1 and 2: Required 

  • Into the  Wild, Jon Krakauer (Anchor, 1996). ISBN-10: 0385486804 / ISBN-13: 978-0385486804
  • The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald (Scribner, 2004). ISBN-10: 0743273567 / ISBN-13: 978-0743273565
  • The Grapes of Wrath, John Steinbeck (Penguin, 2006). ISBN-10: 0143039431 / ISBN-13: 978-0143039433
  • A Raisin in the Sun, Lorraine Hansberry (Vintage, 2004). ISBN-10: 0679755330 /  ISBN-13: 978-0679755333
  • The Way to Rainy Mountain, N. Scott Momaday (University of New Mexico Press, 1976). ISBN-10: 0826304362 / ISBN-13: 978-0826304360
  • The Things They Carried, Tim O’Brien (Mariner Books, 2009). ISBN-10: 0618706410 / ISBN-13: 978-0618706419

AP (Advanced Placement) – English

Authorized by the College Board, courses meet higher-education expectations and prepare students to demonstrate achievement through success on the AP exams.

English IV Honors

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British and World Literature offers a survey of British literature that illustrates the origins of English-language literature and reflects its reach beyond the British Isles. The course is standards-based. Each activity correlates to state standards in six core areas: reading, writing, language (appreciation and aesthetics), listening and speaking, viewing and representing (including media literacy), and research. The course gives students meaningful practice in fundamental literacy skills while introducing them to classics of British and world literature. Throughout the course, students are encouraged to think and respond independently, critically, and creatively to the subject matter, whether it’s a work of literature, a piece of nonfiction writing, or a media work. The course emboldens students to approach these works — both on their own terms and within a larger context — while providing them with the tools and encouragement they need in order to do so.

The content is based on the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) standards and is aligned to state standards.

English III Honors

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American Literature is a general studies program in literature and composition, organized as a survey of American literature. It can stand alone as a complete year of general study in English without a specific prerequisite, but its modular design allows flexibility in how the program is used in the classroom; teachers may use a single unit, lesson, or activity to supplement regular class content. American Literature expands upon and deepens understanding of literary and communication skills covered in Critical Reading and Effective Writing, including reading, writing, language appreciation and aesthetics, listening and speaking, viewing and representing, and research.

Within these general topic areas, special emphasis is placed on writing expository, research, and creative compositions; honing critical and analytic skills through close readings of literary, historical, expository, and functional documents; using context strategies and an understanding of etymology to build vocabulary; and practicing communication skills in online discussions.

Reading selections cover a variety of genres and voices in literature and expository prose. Students read a survey of American literature from colonial to contemporary eras. They are encouraged to respond critically and personally to these works and to use them as a context for thinking about the unique and universal aspects of culture. They learn and practice skills for workplace communication in special activities. Finally, students practice gathering, evaluating, synthesizing, presenting, and documenting information in a unit dedicated to writing research reports.

The content is based on the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) standards and is aligned to state standards.